Re: CCL:dynamical correlation-summary



 Dear netters,
 There are some replies of my question about the terminology of "dynamical
 correlation".
 I thank all responders.
 All replies are NOT the same.
 Especially some American (or British?) natives
 said dynamical and dynamic are almost the same.
 However, almost of the others recognize the distinction of these terms.
 In Oxford English Dictionary (OED) ,
 "-al" means that "of the kind of, pertaining to, of or belonging
 to ,
 relating to
 , dealing with, indirectory or remotely corrected with".
 For example, the electron correlation of
 electons in the ground state of He atom behave "RELATIONALLY TO
 dynamic".
 Thus, "dynamical correlation" must be used, considering not only OED
 and
 some text books
 of QM but also some replies.
 Do you agree this summary?
 This distinction is like as that between "orbit" and
 "orbital".
 For the description of
 wavefunction of a single electron in QM, The latter is correct and almost
 everyone agree that one should not use the former.
 The question of first caller in  this term remains.
 I just refer the Mok, Neumann and Handy's paper (JPC,1996,100,6225).
 Sincerely yours,
 Seiji Mori
 ---My original question---
 As you know, the term of "Dymanical correlation" has been widely used
 for
 chemists.
 As far as I know,  in 1963, O.Sinanoglu and D.F.-T. Tuan (Yale University,
 at that time)
 classified the electron correlation effect, and
 called this term (JCP,1963,38,1743. ). Who first called this term?
 O.Sinanoglu?
 Recently, when one professor studying in organic synthesis (not in
 theoretical chemistry)
 who is a native in English read
 our manuscript which we are preparing for paper and
 pointed out that "dynamical" is incorrect and should change to
 "dynamic".
 My advisor saw this  and said that  "dynamical correlation"  was an
 unnatural word.
 (Note that in English dictionary, I found "dynamical".)
 Why not "dynamic correlation" but "dynamical correlation"?
 Is there a difference of a meaning in English usage?
 Any suggestions and answers would be appreciated.
 I will make a summary and show you.
 ---
  Jan M.L. Martin  (comartin (- at -) wicc.weizmann.ac.il)
 Was the professor an Englishman or an American? "Dynamical" is the
 correct
 spelling in American English. "Thermodynamic" vs.
 "thermodynamical" is
 a related problem.
 ---
 Robert Q. Topper (topper (- at -) cooper.edu)
 Hi
 I can't answer your grammatical question because
 "dynamic correlation" is TECHNICAL JARGON, not proper
 English.
 One other thing is that Oktay Sinanoglu is still at Yale.
 He was on my thesis committee.
 Also, he visits Japan periodically. I believe that he has
 written a Turkish - Japanese dictionary in fact.
 Finally, have a look at "Modern  Quantum Chemistry" by
 Szabo and Ostlund for more historical information.
 I think that Oktay's work is referred to as the IEPA
 (Independent Electron-PAir Approximation).
 best regards
 prof. robert topper
 ---
 Alexander A. Bagatur'yants (sasha (- at -) ioc.ac.ru)
 Dear Seiji
 Though I am not a native British or American, I can say that there are two
 words in English, dynamic and dynamical. The first of them means "possesing
 the ability to move" or just "active, possesing energy" both in
 physical and
 in every-day-life meanings. Dynamical means "related to dynamic
 behavior" so
 that electron correlation is dynamical and not dynamic. When I started to
 translate from my native language  (Russian) into English, my American
 colleagues edited "geometrical parameters" like "geometric
 parameters", but
 they were wrong! Sometimes, you need to be a specialist in the given field
 in order to correctly differentiate between subtle variations in word
 constructions.
 Yours
 ---
 David C. Doherty(doherty (- at -) msc.edu)
 >Recently, when one professor studying in organic synthesis (not in
 >theoretical chemistry)
 >who is a native in English read
 >our manuscript which we are preparing for paper and
 >pointed out that "dynamical" is incorrect and should change to
 "dynamic".
 >My advisor saw this  and said that  "dynamical correlation"  was
 an
 >unnatural word.
 >(Note that in English dictionary, I found "dynamical".)
 >
 >Why not "dynamic correlation" but "dynamical
 correlation"?
 Either is correct; "dynamic" is more common.
 >
 >Is there a difference of a meaning in English usage?
 no.
 ---
 Joel Polowin( polowin (- at -) hyper.hyper.com )
 This is not an easy question, since "dynamic" and
 "dynamical" have
 essentially the same meaning.  To me, it seems that "dynamical" is
 just
 not used very much, perhaps because the meanings are the same so people
 use the shorter word.
 Compare with "mechanic" and "mechanical", as in
 "quantum mechanical".
 In English, "mechanic" is specifically a noun while
 "mechanical" is an
 adjective.  Although "dynamic" *can* be used as a noun, it is more
 usually an adjective, and this is usually clear from the usage.
 I am not sure that the distinction between "dynamic" and
 "dynamical"
 can be explained well.  I think it is one of those little quirks of the
 English language: that's just the way we do it.
 Regards,
 Joel
 polowin (- at -) hyper.com
 ---
 Alexander J Turner  (A.J.Turner (- at -) bath.ac.uk  )
 Hi!
 I am not a english professional - but I would suggest that
 dynamical  - means correlation of something that is dynamic
 dynamic    - means correlation that is its self dynamic
 Hence the use of the term dynamical.
 Best wishes
 Alex
 ---
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   Seiji Mori
   Graduate student
  Lab. of Physical Organic Chemistry
   Department of Chemistry
  The University of Tokyo
  Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyou-ku, Tokyo 113,
   JAPAN.
  email:smori (- at -) utsc.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp
            smori (- at -) utsc3.chem.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp
 ---
 http://www.chem.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp/Students/smori.html
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